Sketches old and new, for a project I have in (seemingly perennial) development. Some have been turning out good lately so I thought I’d throw some up here.

A lot of my personal drawing is done around characters where I’ve defined a lot of the costume (or superheroes where it’s been defined for me), and the character/attitude that fits them, so I can just explore design, and shape and line quality and such.

cedrichohnstadt
skunkandburningtires:

Glen Keane’s 7 Animation Essentials
1. Make a Positive Statement
Do not be ambiguous in your approach.
Thumbnail until you have that clear approach and conviction.
Be bold and decisive.
2. Animate From the Heart
Feel your drawings.
Let your action be an extension of how you believe the character feels.
Put yourself in the place of the character your animating- associate.
3. Make Expressions and Attitudes Real and Living
Focus on the eyes and eyebrows, mouth and cheeks.
Always lead with the eyes.
Be sure the eyes are solid and placed securely in the head.
Study your own attitudes. Ask yourself, “Does this drawing feel the way my face feels?”
4. Draw As If You Were Sculpting
Describe the forms in dimension.
Understand the character design in 3D.
5. Animate the Forces
Allow the momentum of and already animated movement to suggest the next drawing.
Draw the leading edge of forces.
6. Visualize and Feel Dialogue
Be sure you are truly capturing the inflection, volume and tone of the dialog with proper mouth shapes.
7. Simplicity
What is the essence of your scene, your action, your expression — what is indispensable in communicating your thought?

skunkandburningtires:

Glen Keane’s 7 Animation Essentials

1. Make a Positive Statement

  • Do not be ambiguous in your approach.
  • Thumbnail until you have that clear approach and conviction.
  • Be bold and decisive.

2. Animate From the Heart

  • Feel your drawings.
  • Let your action be an extension of how you believe the character feels.
  • Put yourself in the place of the character your animating- associate.

3. Make Expressions and Attitudes Real and Living

  • Focus on the eyes and eyebrows, mouth and cheeks.
  • Always lead with the eyes.
  • Be sure the eyes are solid and placed securely in the head.
  • Study your own attitudes. Ask yourself, “Does this drawing feel the way my face feels?”

4. Draw As If You Were Sculpting

  • Describe the forms in dimension.
  • Understand the character design in 3D.

5. Animate the Forces

  • Allow the momentum of and already animated movement to suggest the next drawing.
  • Draw the leading edge of forces.

6. Visualize and Feel Dialogue

  • Be sure you are truly capturing the inflection, volume and tone of the dialog with proper mouth shapes.

7. Simplicity

  • What is the essence of your scene, your action, your expression — what is indispensable in communicating your thought?

Trying to do more sequentials. I enjoy trying to figure out panel design and I’m pushing myself to do more work in color. Barda and Scott Free are some of my favorite characters, and Kirby’s Fourth World stuff is just a super fun world to play in. I like how Scott lives on Earth and has an actual day job as an entertainer, and just sortof gets swept up in the epic of the Fourth World. The mundane and the epic side-by-side is part of what helps Kirby’s stuff ring true, even with all the larger-than-life dialog and stuff. That’s kinda what I was going for here, just the mundane idea of a family game night turned on its head by the crazy world these characters come from. Anyhow, I had fun with this one. 

Also made up a process progression for my fellow artists out there. Pencils, Sketchbook Pro, and a little dab or two of Photoshop. Fonts come from Blambot, if you’re interested in that sort of thing.